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#15 – Once a cheater, always a cheater

Once a cheater, always a cheater…right?

In our 15th episode, Joe and Dr. Zhana spoke with Kayla Knopp, the lead author on a study that focuses on the likelihood of “serial cheating” in individuals. Based on a nationwide sample of almost 500 people in unmarried romantic relationships followed every 4-6 months over a period of 5 years as they ended their initial relationship and entered a second one found that there may be some truth to that saying. Specifically, those who had cheated on their partner in the first relationship were three times more likely to have cheated on their next partner than people who had not cheated on their first partner (45% vs 18%).

About Our Guest

Knopp is currently a PhD candidate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Denver, working under Dr. Galena Rhoades, Dr. Howard Markman, and Dr. Scott Stanley in the Center for Marital and Family Studies in the Department of Psychology at DU. Her research focuses on couples and romantic relationships, with particular focus on commitment processes, diversity, and statistical modeling.

Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay…

The number of millennials having anal sex has doubled in the past 12 years, but maybe not for the best reasons. In a review of three UK studies of more than 45,000 aged between 16 to 24-years-old, researchers found teenage girls and young women are now under increasing pressure to have anal sex even though they find it painful. The study, published in the Journal Adolescent Health, found some of the largest increases in the prevalence of oral and anal sex over the past decade were observed among those aged 16-18. Read full article here.

On the other end of the age spectrum, a new study found that men are three times more likely to experience an increase in sexual frequency after getting a vasectomy. Four out of ten of those surveyed said their sex lives had ‘significantly improved’. Men who had vasectomies also said they had higher sex drives, better erections and orgasms and were more satisfied. And the benefits were not just for the men. Women reported an increase in their sexual arousal after their partner had the operation. Read more here.

Afterglow

Have you ever had trouble keeping your mind at ease during sex? You’re not alone, and your case is far from hopeless! More and more people are practicing mindfulness when it comes to sex, and research is showing that it leads to better sex and can help treat female sexual dysfunction. Mindfulness, simply put, is focusing on what’s happening in the present moment, and while it might sound easy, that’s not always the case. It takes practice and patience, so if you’re curious read more about it here.

Read articles discussed here:

Stress and Sex

Female Sexual Dysfunction






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The science of sex podcast is a weekly podcast that seeks to bring scientifically accurate information about everyone's favorite topic.

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